Engineer & Entertain

Ideas I grapple with

Flags of our fathers

My dad died on 04 Apr 2013. Having served in the army in his younger days, he earned a flag on behalf of a grateful nation. The build details of a flag case from an honored and grateful son are below.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

The box is 16 inches tall and about 25.5 inches long. The boards were ripped to 4 inches wide. A rabbet was routed to hold the back and a groove was routed to hold the plexiglass.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

The back is thin plywood. Spray adhesive was used to attach felt to it. The photos were also glued on with spray adhesive. The plaque was mounted with bolts.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

A miter hand saw was used to cut the ends at 45 degrees. Despite using a miter box, one of the ends was not at 45 degrees, ergo the miters were not tight.
Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

A common woodworking adage is that a master carpenter is not someone who makes no mistakes, but is able to hide them. I am no master woodworker, but I did hide the gaps with a moulding I routed with a roundover bit. I double checked my angles and was able to cut gapless miters for the moulding frame. The frame was glued on.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Distracted by the miter issues, I forgot to create small recesses for the shell casings from my dad’s 21 gun salute. I epoxied them in place which worked out just fine, but what was not what I originally intended. The casings are spaced one casing length away from each other.

Casing test fit

Once glued and nailed, the whole thing was given 3 coats of boiled lineseed oil. 15-20 minutes followed each coat. A coat of spray shellac was applied a day later. Once the shellac dried, a coat of wax was applied and buffed by hand.

Tons of credit goes to Steve Ramsey of Woodworking For Mere Mortals. This design was taken from him and would have been copied exactly if I could have cut tight miters the first time around. Thank you, Steve. Thank you, veterans. Thank you, dad, for being awesome.

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